School Improvement in Maryland

Step 3: Conducting CFIP

Applying these six steps enables school teams to use data to target re-teaching, implement enrichments and interventions where needed, and plan for instructional improvement in the next unit.

Step 3 Video Example:

STEP 3 (THE PATTERNS STEP): IDENTIFY THE MAJOR PATTERNS OF STUDENTS' STRENGTHS AND NEEDS AT THE CLASS LEVEL.

At this step of the CFIP protocol, team members describe what they see over and over again in the data at the whole class level. Patterns of the major class-wide strengths and needs should first be discerned within one data source and then, if possible, by triangulating (bringing together) data from multiple sources. This prioritization is important so team members can focus their re-teaching or differentiated instruction in response to the data. The goal at this step is a limited and actionable list of strengths and needs.

The team should be very specific and concrete in identifying patterns of strengths and weaknesses, first for the grade as whole, and then for each class in the grade. In the Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards, this means analyzing data at the level of the essential skills and knowledge that have been designated for the grade.

Major strengths should be identified first, so they can be built on in later lessons. If the assessment includes multiple objectives and many strengths or needs surface, the team will need to prioritize and note only the two or three objectives that are most essential for future student learning.

These questions could be used:

  • What essential skills and knowledge are the most important overall class strengths (from more than one data source, if possible)?
  • What essential skills and knowledge are the most important overall class needs (from more than one data source, if possible)?