School Improvement in Maryland

Using the State Curriculum: US History, High School

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U.S. History

Standard 5 United States History

Students will examine significant ideas, beliefs and themes; organize patterns and events; analyze how individuals and societies have changed over time in Maryland and the United States.

Expectation

1. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from Reconstruction to 1897.

Topic

A. RECONSTRUCTION AND AN EXPANDING AMERICA (RECONSTRUCTION-1897)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze the economic, political and social consequences of Reconstruction.
Objectives
  1. Analyze the political and social impact of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments, such as the election of African-Americans to local, state, and federal offices (PS, PNW)
  2. Evaluate the power struggle between the executive and legislative branches at the national level during Reconstruction, such as Presidential v. Congressional Reconstruction plans
  3. Evaluate the social and economic effects of sharecropping, tenant farming and the Freedman’s Bureau in the post Civil War South (PNW, G, E)
  4. Analyze the practices, policies and legislation used to deny African-Americans’ civil rights, including black codes, lynching, the Ku Klux Klan, voting restrictions, Jim Crow Laws and Plessy v. Ferguson(1896) (PS, PNW, E)
  5. Examine African-American responses to the denial of civil rights such as the rise of African-American churches, African-American newspapers, historically black colleges and the responses of individuals, such as Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington (PS, PNW)
  6. Analyze the economic, political and social factors that influenced the end of Reconstruction, such as northern reluctance to advocate for African-American equality, corruption in government, the Panic of 1873, and the election of 1876 (PS, E)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze the factors that led to and characteristics of Industrialization in the late 19th century United States (5.1.2).
Objectives
  1. Analyze the causes of industrialization including improved use of resources, technology, labor, capital and transportation networks (PNW, G, E)
  2. Describe laissez-faire attitudes toward capitalism and the changes in the organization of businesses, such as trusts, holding companies, and monopolies and their impact on government policy and regulation (E)
  3. Describe new technologies and inventions in agriculture, transportation, communication, manufacturing and the impact on individuals, groups and regions (PNW, G, E)
  4. Analyze the shift in government intervention and regulation of the economy, such as protective tariffs, the Sherman Anti-Trust Act and the Interstate Commerce Act (PS, E)
  5. Evaluate the role of business leaders, such as Andrew Carnegie, John Rockefeller, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and J.P. Morgan in transforming the United States economy (PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 3. Examine the economic, political and social impact of industrialization (5.1.3).
Objectives
  1. Evaluate the impact of industrialization and laissez-faire policies on workers, such as the National Labor Union, Knights of Labor, American Federation of Labor, and the impact of events, such as the Haymarket Riot, Homestead Strike, and the Pullman Strike (PS, PNW, E)
  2. Evaluate the impact of industrialization on regional development, settlement patterns and quality of life (PNW, G, E)
  3. Evaluate the government and public response to immigrants as a result of industrialization, such as nativism, the Americanization Movement, and immigration restrictions (PS, PNW, G)
  4. Describe both the positive and negative functions of political machines and their influence at the state and local level (PS, PNW)
  5. Describe the relationship between industrialization and urbanization, such as increased socio-economic stratification, innovations in technology and transportation on urban life (PNW, G, E)
  6. Examine the responses to social problems created by industrial growth, such as the Social Gospel movement, the Gospel of Wealth and Social Darwinism (PNW)
  7. Evaluate the economic, political and social conditions that prompted the rise of the Populist movement (PS, PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 4. Analyze the causes and consequences of westward expansion (5.1.4).
Objectives
  1. Analyze the factors of westward expansion, including the rise of industrialization, concept of Manifest Destiny, perceptions of overcrowding, opportunities to acquire land, and the discovery of gold and silver (PNW, G, E)
  2. Describe the impact of geography and technology on the settlement of the west, such as mining, ranching, lumbering and farming and the environmental consequences (G, E)
  3. Evaluate the impact of westward expansion on Native Americans and their responses to the destruction of the buffalo, military conflicts, and the Dawes Severalty Act (1887) (PS, PNW, G)
  4. Evaluate the impact of government actions on migration patterns, such as the Homestead Act of 1862, state land grant acts, and the development of the Transcontinental Railroad (PS, G)
  5. Describe the experiences of minorities in the west, such as extended rights for African Americans, the mistreatment of Chinese and Irish immigrants, and the extension of political and legal rights to women (PS, PNW, G)

Expectation

2. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1898 to 1929.

Topic

A. CHALLENGES OF A NEW CENTURY (1898-1929)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze the cultural, economic, political, and social impact of the Progressive Movement (5.2.1).
Objectives
  1. Analyze the impact of the muckrakers of the Progressive Movement on child labor reform, workplace conditions and government reforms (PS, PNW, E)
  2. Describe local, state and national reforms that addressed political corruption, including secret ballot, referendum, initiative, recall, the city manager, and the direct election of senators (PS)
  3. Describe the impact of the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th amendments to the Constitution (PS, PNW, E)
  4. Describe the impact of government actions on big business and labor, such as Supreme Court cases and legislation as remedies to problems in society (PS, PNW, E)
  5. Analyze the role of presidential power and the shaping of the modern presidency, such as the Square Deal and Roosevelt’s response to the 1902 Coal Strike (PS, E)
  6. Evaluate how the Progressive movement impacted women and immigrants (PS, PNW)
  7. Analyze African American responses to inequality, such as the Niagara Movement, the establishment of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Urban League, and the Universal Negro Improvement Association (PS, PNW, G, E)
  8. Analyze conservationism and creation of national parks during the Roosevelt administration (PS, G, E)
  9. Explain reasons for the creation of the Federal Reserve System and its influence on the economy of the 1920s (PS, E)
  10. Describe the positive and negative impact of the Progressive Era (PS, PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze United States foreign policy in the era of Imperialism (5.2.2).
Objectives
  1. Describe factors that contributed to imperialism, such as the industrial revolution, racism, a desire to spread Christianity, a desire for naval power, the closing of the American frontier, and the resulting emergence of nationalism/jingoism (PS, G, E)
  2. Examine the impact of the Spanish American War, such as the acquisition of new territories (PS, G)
  3. Describe the impact of United States policy in Latin America, such as the events leading to the construction of the Panama Canal, the Roosevelt Corollary, Dollar Diplomacy, and Moral Diplomacy (PS, E)
  4. Analyze the impact of United States foreign policy in East Asia such as the Open Door Policy, the renewal of the Chinese Exclusion Act (PS, E)
  5. Analyze the arguments of Americans who opposed imperialism, such as the Anti-Imperialist League and organized labor (PS, PNW)
  6. Analyze the impact of imperialism, empire building and colonization on native societies (PS, PNW, G)

Indicator

  • 3. Analyze United States foreign policies during World War I (5.2.3)
Objectives
  1. Describe the factors leading to World War I, including militarism, the formation of alliances, nationalism, imperialism, and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (PS, PNW, G, E)
  2. Analyze the events leading to United States entry into World War I, including unrestricted submarine warfare, and the Zimmerman Note (PS)
  3. Analyze the significance of Woodrow Wilson's foreign policy decisions, including the Fourteen Points and the debate over the ratification of the Treaty of Versailles (PS, PNW)
  4. Describe the effects of the Treaty of Versailles, its provisions for reparations, the “war guilt” clause, the League of Nations and changes in national boundaries on international conflicts after World War I (PS, G)
  5. Analyze the impact of United States involvement in World War I on future foreign policy (PS, G)

Indicator

  • 4. Analyze the cultural, economic, political and social changes in society during World War I and throughout the 1920s (5.2.4).
Objectives
  1. Examine the restrictions on civil liberties during World War I (PS, PNW)
  2. Describe how World War I led to an increase in nativism and xenophobia in the United States, such as anti-German sentiment, anti-immigration attitudes, anti-Semitism, and the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan (PNW)
  3. Describe the political and social consequences of the Red Scare, including the Palmer Raids, immigration restrictions and the Sacco and Vanzetti case (PS, PNW)
  4. Examine the connection between Prohibition and the emergence of organized crime (PS, PNW)
  5. Describe the tension between fundamentalism and the changing social values, including Prohibition, and the issues surrounding the Scopes Monkey Trial (PS, PNW)
  6. Describe the changing social and economic role of women and the impact of the woman’s suffrage movement (PS, PNW, E)
  7. Analyze the shift of African American demographics from the rural South to the urban/industrial north and west during the Great Migration and the consequences of the migration on regions (PNW, G)
  8. Analyze the relationship between the arts and social and political changes, such as the Harlem Renaissance, the rise of youth culture, the leisure culture, radio and motion pictures, the Jazz Age, and the “lost” generation (PS, PNW)
  9. Analyze the consumer culture of the 1920s, such as the growth of advertising, the impact of the automobile industry, mail order catalogues, and department stores (PNW, G, E)
  10. Examine the economic characteristics of the 1920s that led to the stock market crash of 1929 and to the Great Depression, such as the unequal distribution of income, buying on credit, buying stocks on margin, inflated real estate prices and overproduction in industry, and agriculture (E)

Expectation

3. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1929-1945.

Topic

A. THE UNITED STATES IN A TIME OF CRISIS (1929-1945)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze the consequences and government responses to the Great Depression (5.3.1)
Objectives
  1. Evaluate the hardships of the Great Depression on various groups in American society, including families, farmers, African Americans, and industrial workers (PNW, G, E)
  2. Describe the responses of the Hoover administration to the Great Depression (PS, G, E)
  3. Describe the responses of the Roosevelt administration to the Great Depression (PS, G, E)
  4. Analyze the effectiveness of New Deal programs, such as Social Security Administration (SSA), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA,) Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) (PS, E)
  5. Describe the arguments of New Deal critics such as Huey Long, Father Charles Coughlin, and Dr. Charles Townshend (PS, PNW, E)
  6. Describe the influence of the arts, film, and the popularity of radio in helping Americans deal with the trials of the Great Depression (PNW)
  7. Analyze the lasting legacy of the New Deal, including economic stability and the increased involvement of the government in the lives of citizens (PS, PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze the causes of World War II in Europe and the Pacific and the involvement of the United States in the war (5.3.2).
Objectives
  1. Explain the events that led to the beginning of the Second World War including the failure of the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes in Europe and Asia and the worldwide recession of the 1920s and 1930s. (PS, E)
  2. Explain the United States gradual involvement in the war in Europe through legislative and executive measures, such as Cash and Carry, Lend Lease, and the Atlantic Charter (PS, PNW, E)
  3. Describe how the economic and political conflicts between Japan and the United States led to the attack on Pearl Harbor (PS, E)
  4. Examine military strategies and technologies employed by the United States in WWII including D-Day, island hopping and the development and use of atomic weapons (PS, PNW, G, E)
  5. Investigate the response of the United States government to the discovery of the Holocaust and immigration policies with respect to refugees (PS, PNW)
  6. Analyze how the events, such as the Yalta and Potsdam conferences and creation of the United Nations shaped the post war world (PS, PNW)
  7. Analyze the long-term consequences of the United States’ involvement in WWII and the emergence of America as a economic and military force (PS, PNW, G, E)

Indicator

  • 3. Evaluate the economic, political and social impact of World War II on America’s home front (5.3.3).
Objectives
  1. Describe how American citizens supported the war effort through rationing and purchasing of war bonds (PS, E)
  2. Evaluate the government’s use of propaganda in gaining support and cooperation for war efforts (PS, PNW, E)
  3. Evaluate the decision of the government to limit civil liberties during World War II (PS, PNW)
  4. Evaluate the decision of the government to relocate American citizens and aliens to internment camps during the war (PS, PNW, G)
  5. Describe the changing roles of women, African-Americans and other minority groups during the war years, such as access to education and jobs (PS, PNW, G)

Expectation

4. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political, social and technological developments from 1946-1968.

Topic

A. CHALLENGES OF THE POST WAR WORLD (1946-1968)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze the causes, events and policies of the Cold War between 1946-1968 (5.4.1).
Objectives
  1. Describe the response of the United States to communist expansion in Europe, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Airlift (1948), and the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (PS, G, E)
  2. Describe the development of United States containment policies in Asia as a result of the rise of Communist China (PS, G)
  3. Analyze the role of the United States in the United Nations, including the establishment of the state of Israel and participation in the Korean Conflict (PS, PNW, G)
  4. Analyze the impact of Cold War events in Cuba, including the Bay of Pigs Invasion (1961) and Cuban Missile Crisis (1962) and the expansion of the Cold War into the Western Hemisphere (PS, G)
  5. Examine the causes and escalation of United States involvement in the Vietnam War, including the domino theory and Tonkin Gulf resolution (PS, G)
  6. Analyze the competition and the consequences of the space and arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union, including the impact of Sputnik (PS, PNW)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze the economic, political and social changes within the United States during the period 1946-1968 (5.4.2).
Objectives
  1. Describe the conflict between protecting civil liberties and maintaining national security that arose during the second Red Scare, such as House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), Federal Employees Loyalty Program, McCarthyism, and the Rosenberg case (PS, PNW)
  2. Describe the impact of the creation of the interstate highway system, such as the evolution of suburbia, increasing dependence on the automobile and movement of people and industry away from central cities (G, E)
  3. Describe the economic boom of the 1950s and the impact on American life, such as the G.I. Bill on the qualifications of workers, the increase of consumerism, increasing dependence on oil, and the development of the leisure class (PNW, E)
  4. Describe the baby boom and its consequences on American society (PNW, E)
  5. Analyze the growing impact of television and other mass media on politics and political attitudes, such as the Kennedy-Nixon debate, the Vietnam conflict, and the Civil Rights movement (PS, PNW)
  6. Describe the overall goals of the Great Society and its programs, such as the War on Poverty and Medicare/Medicaid (PS, PNW, G, E)
  7. Analyze the significance of the Warren Court in decisions, including Mapp v. Ohio (1961), Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), and Miranda v. Arizona (1966) (PS)
  8. Analyze the economic, political and social impact of the changing role of women (PS, PNW, E)
  9. Examine trends in popular culture from 1946-1968 such as advertising, the beat movement, rock and roll music, the growth of television, and changes in the motion picture industry (PNW)

Indicator

  • 3. Analyze the major developments, controversies and consequences of the Civil Rights Movement between 1946-1968 (5.4.3).
Objectives
  1. Examine the battle for school desegregation, including Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954) and the roles of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Thurgood Marshall (PS, G)
  2. Describe the efforts to enforce school desegregation and local reactions to these efforts, including crisis at Little Rock (1957) and the University of Mississippi (1962) (PS, G)
  3. Describe various activities that Civil Rights activists used to protest segregation, including boycotts, sit- ins, marches, and voter registration campaigns (PS, E)
  4. Compare the philosophies of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X and the Black Power Movement (PS, PNW)
  5. Describe the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s and Malcolm X’s leadership and assassinations on the Civil Rights Movement (PS, PNW)
  6. Describe the goals of Civil Rights legislation, including the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1968, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the 24th Amendment (PS)
  7. Describe why urban violence and race riots escalated during the 1960s in reaction to ongoing discrimination and the slow pace of Civil Rights advances (PS, PNW, G)
  8. Analyze the opposition to the Civil Rights Movement, such as the Dixiecrats, white citizens councils, white supremacist movements (PS, PNW)

Expectation

5. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political and social developments from 1968 to 1980.

Topic

A. DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED (1968-1980)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze foreign policy and domestic response to events in South East Asia (5.5.1).
Objectives
  1. Analyze the significance of key events during the Vietnam War, including the Tet Offensive (1968), the My Lai Massacre (1968), the publication of the Pentagon Papers, and the invasions of Cambodia and Laos (1970) (PS, PNW, G)
  2. Explain the development of the anti-war movement and its consequences for American society, including reactions to the military draft and returning veterans, the polarization of society, the Chicago Democratic Convention (1968), and Kent State (1970) (PS, PNW)
  3. Evaluate the effectiveness of the media on shaping public opinion about the Vietnam War and the invasions of Cambodia and Laos (PS, PNW)
  4. Describe the actions the United States took to withdraw from the Vietnam War and the effects on the Vietnamese, including Vietnamization (PNW, PS, G)
  5. Describe how and why the War Powers Act (1973) changed presidential power (PS)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze significant events that affected United States foreign policy from 1968-1980 outside of Southeast Asia (5.5.2).
Objectives
  1. Evaluate the changing United States relationship with the Soviet Union, including détente, arms control agreements, such as SALT I (1972), and SALT II (1979), the invasion of Afghanistan, and the decision to boycott the 1980 Olympic Games ( PS, PNW, G)
  2. Describe the impact of the changing relationship between the United States and China (PS, G)
  3. Analyze how Arab-Israeli tensions impacted United States foreign policy, including the Energy Crisis (1973), and Camp David Accords (1979) (PS, PNW, G, E)
  4. Describe the political tensions that led to the Iranian Hostage Crisis (1980) (PS, PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 3. Evaluate the impact of government politics and domestic policy on American society from 1968 to 1980 (5.5.3).
Objectives
  1. Analyze the impact of the Watergate crisis on American attitudes toward the government and the office of the President (PS, PNW).
  2. Describe the public awareness of increased environmental problems and government efforts to address them, such as the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, The Clean Air Act, The Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act (PS, PNW, G, E)
  3. Evaluate the increasing role of regulatory agencies in protecting United States citizens, such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (PS, E)
  4. Describe the impact of "stagflation" and deficit spending on the American economy (PS, E)
  5. Describe the cause of the energy crisis in the 1970s and its effect on American society (PNW, E)

Indicator

  • 4. Analyze the major developments, controversies and consequences of the civil rights movements from 1968 to 1980 (5.5.4).
Objectives
  1. Evaluate the impact of school desegregation stemming from the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) decision, including local implementation of busing (PS, PNW)
  2. Describe the controversy involving the extension of civil rights through the implementation of Affirmative Action, such as the Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978) (PS, PNW, E)
  3. Describe the Native American quest for civil rights, including the establishment of the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the implementation of legislation (PS, PNW)
  4. Describe the Latino quest for civil rights and the formation of the United Farm Workers Union (PNW, G, E)
  5. Describe the impact of the women’s movement on government actions such as Higher Education Act Title IX (1972), the Equal Rights Amendment (1972)(PS, PNW, E)

Expectation

6. Students will demonstrate understanding of the cultural, economic, political and social developments from 1981 to the present.

Topic

A. AMERICA IMPACTS THE WORLD (1981-PRESENT)

Indicator

  • 1. Analyze United States foreign policy from 1981 to the present (5.6.1).
Objectives
  1. Describe how United States policies and actions contributed to the end of the Cold War (PS)
  2. Evaluate United States policies and actions in response to international terrorism, such as the attack on the Marine barracks in Beirut (1983), Embassy bombings (2000), the attacks on the U.S.S. Cole (2000), and September 11, 2001 (PS, E)
  3. Describe how the United States has addressed issues related to global economic interdependence, such as free trade v. protectionism, and the debate over outsourcing (PS, G, E)
  4. Describe United States involvement with international and regional organizations, such as the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and the United Nations (UN) (PS, PNW, G, E)
  5. Explain how developments in the Middle East have affected United States foreign policy, such as the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, the rise of political Islam, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflicts (PS, PNW, G)
  6. Evaluate the role of the United States in addressing global and humanitarian issues such as the environment, the A.I.D.S. epidemic, healthcare and human rights (PS, PNW, G)
  7. Explain how the dependence on energy sources shapes United States foreign policy (PS, G, E)
  8. Analyze the purposes and effects of United States military interventions using regional case studies in the context of the Cold War, international peacekeeping efforts, and responses to terrorism before and after September 11, 2001 (PS, PNW, G, E)

Indicator

  • 2. Analyze modern economic, political and social influences on American society from 1981-present (5.6.2).
Objectives
  1. Describe the political and social issues that polarized United States political culture after 1980, such as Iran-Contra, conflicts over judicial appointments, the controversial election of 2000, criticism of federal government subsistence programs and conservative v. liberal debates (PS, PNW, E)
  2. Evaluate how the government has addressed changing demographics, including immigration, the changing age structure and increasing minority populations in the United States (PS, PNW, G)
  3. Analyze how globalization has increased due to economic and technological innovations, such as outsourcing, computers, cell phones, and the Internet (PNW, G, E)
  4. Describe the significance of the growing federal deficit and the impact of the global market, such as supply-side economics, entitlements, and loss of domestic industry (PS, G, E)
  5. Explain the influence of special-interest groups, the media and political parties on the changing political landscape and culture (PS, PNW)

Note: The course U.S. History: Reconstruction to the Present appears in the State Curriculum in the fifth standard- History. While the course indicators and objectives appear in the History Standard, the content also includes the study of Political Science (PS), Peoples of the Nations and World (PNW), Geography (G), and Economics (E). The acronyms that appear in parentheses following the objectives indicate which standards are also measured by the objectives.
 
In the language of the objectives for Social Studies VSC, the use of including refers to information that is recommended for instruction. The use of such as in the language of the objective refers to information that may be used by the teacher as examples, but is not required.

February 27, 2006