State Standards - Social Studies

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Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to understand location and its relationship to human activities. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to understand location and its relationship to human activities. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to understand location and its relationship to human activities. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to understand location and its relationship to human activities. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to understand location and its relationship to human activities. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time. Standard 3.0 Geography: Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution of human activities and spatial connections throughout time.
A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools A. Using Geographic Tools
1. Recognize that a globe and maps are used to help people locate places
1. Identify and describe how a globe and maps can be used to help people locate places
1. Use geographic tools to locate and describe places on Earth
1. Use geographic tools to locate and describe places on Earth
1. Use geographic tools to locate and construct meaning about places on Earth
1. Use geographic tools to locate places and describe the human and physical characteristics of those places
1. Use geographic tools to locate places and describe human and physical characteristics in Colonial America
1. Use geographic tools to locate places and describe the human and physical characteristics in early world history
1. Use geographic tools to locate places and describe the human and physical characteristics in the contemporary world
1. Use geographic tools to analyze geographic issues and problems prior to 1877
a. Recognize that maps are models of places
a. Describe a globe as a model of Earth showing land and water
a. Locate the continents and oceans using maps and a globe
a. Identify the purpose and use of a globe and a variety of maps and atlases, such as school maps, neighborhood maps and simple atlases
a. Describe the purposes of a variety of maps and atlases, such as transportation maps, physical maps, and political maps
a. Construct and interpret a variety of maps using map elements
a. Use map elements to interpret and construct a variety of maps
a. Use maps to compare geographic locations of civilizations from world history to:
  • Mesopotamia
  • Africa including Egypt
  • Nubia/Kush and Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Indus River Valley
  • Northern China
  • Greeks and Romans
  • Mesoamerican, such as the Incas, Mayans and Aztecs
a. Use maps to compare geographic locations of places and regions
a. Use thematic maps to locate places and describe the human and physical characteristics, such as settlement patterns, migration, population density, transportation, and communication networks
b. Recognize that a globe is a model of Earth
b. Describe how maps are models showing physical features and/or human features of places
b. Use photographs and pictures to describe a place
b. Identify and use map elements, such as title, compass rose, simple grid system, legend/key, date, and author to interpret a map
b. Construct and interpret maps by using elements, such as title, compass rose, simple grid system, scale, legend/key, date, and author
b. Use photographs, maps, charts, graphs, and atlases to describe geographic characteristics of Maryland/United States
b. Use a globe and a variety of maps, atlases to identify natural/physical features of colonial settlements
b. Use photographs and thematic maps, to identify and describe physical and human characteristics of early civilizations
b. Use photographs and thematic maps to compare human and physical characteristics of places and regions
b. Explain interrelationships among physical and human characteristics that shaped the nation
c. Make maps by drawing, building with blocks, and playing with clay, puzzles, pictures, and photographs
c. Identify a location by using terms such as near-far, above-below, and here-there
c. Identify a place using bird's eye view
c. Identify the equator, poles, seven continents, four oceans, and countries on a map and globe
c. Identify the location of communities, major cities in Maryland, United States and the world using a globe, maps, and atlases
c. Identify and locate natural/physical features and human-made features of Maryland such as Appalachian Mountains, Piedmont Plateau, and Atlantic Coastal Plain
c. Use photographs, maps, and drawings to describe geographic characteristics
  c. Analyze geographic issues and problems
c. Analyze thematic maps to determine demographic and economic information about a region
  d. Identify pictures and photographs that represent places on a map such as a playground and a fire station
d. Define map elements as parts of a map that make it easy to use
d. Describe a place using bird's eye view, and satellite images, photographs, and pictures
  d. Identify and locate natural/physical features and human-made features of the United States
d. Compare geographic locations and geographic characteristics of colonial settlements, such as, Jamestown, Plymouth, Boston, Philadelphia, Charleston, and New York City
     
    e. Describe where places are located on a map using relative distance and direction, such as near-far, above-below and cardinal directions (north, south, east, and west)
             
B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions B. Geographic Characteristics of Places and Regions
1. Recognize that places in the immediate environment have specific physical and human-made features
1. Describe places in the immediate environment using natural/physical and human-made features
1. Describe places in the environment using geographic characteristics
1. Classify places and regions in an environment using geographic characteristics
1. Compare places and regions around the world using geographic characteristics
1. Describe similarities and differences of regions by using geographic characteristics
1. Examine the similarities and differences of regions in Colonial America
1. Examine how physical and human characteristics shape the identity of places and regions and influence the development of civilizations in world history
1. Analyze interrelationships among physical and human characteristics that shape the identity of places and regions around the world
1. Analyze how geographic characteristics influenced the location and development of regions in the United States prior to 1877
a. Discuss that places have natural/physical features such as mountains, rivers, and hills
a. Recognize physical features as landforms and bodies of water using photographs and pictures
a. Identify and describe physical characteristics of a place (physical features, climate, vegetation and animal life)
a. Identify natural/physical features and human-made features using maps and photographs
a. Compare places and regions using geographic features
a. Compare physical characteristics of different places and regions of Maryland and the United States including natural/physical features, weather and climate, soil, vegetation, minerals and animal life
a. Compare the natural/physical and human characteristics of the three colonial regions
  • New England
  • Middle
  • Southern
a. Identify and describe physical characteristics that influenced human settlement
a. Identify and describe physical characteristics that influenced human settlement
a. Analyze how geographic characteristics influenced the location and development of economic activities, such as farming, lumbering, fur trading, whaling and the rise of industry in the early national period
b. Discuss that places have human-made features, such as streets, buildings, and parks
b. Identify land forms, such as mountains and hills, and bodies of water, such as oceans, rivers, and streams
b. Identify human characteristics of a place (human-made features, language, political system, how people make a living)
b. Describe and classify regions using climate, vegetation, animal life, and natural/physical features
b. Identify natural/physical and human-made features of places and regions
b. Compare human characteristics of different places and regions of Maryland the United States, including human-made features, language, religions, political systems, economic activity, and population distribution
b. Describe how geographic characteristics of a place or region changed from early settlements through the colonial period
b. Explain how physical characteristics of a place influenced human activities, such as agriculture, transportation, art and architecture and economic activity in the ancient world
b. Explain how physical and human characteristics of a region such as vegetation, climate, minerals, population density and religion, affect its economic growth and the way people make a living
b. Describe how changes in transportation systems, such as roads, canals and railroads affected the expansion of trade and settlement
  c. Using photographs and pictures, recognize human-made features as modifications people have made to the land
c. Describe places by how people make a living and where they live
c. Classify places as rural and urban
c. Describe population distribution of places and regions such as rural and urban
c. Describe how geographic characteristics of a place or region change over time and affect the way people live and work
c. Explain how geographic characteristics affect how people live and work, and the population distribution of a place or region
c. Explain how human perceptions of and interactions with the environment changed over time in due to technologies, such as road building, dam construction, and agricultural improvements
c. Analyze how regional characteristics and interests including economic development, climate, and the environmental impact government policies
c. Analyze how geographic characteristics stimulated regional growth, such as the purchase of the Louisiana Territory
  d. Identify human-made features, such as buildings, sidewalks, streets, and bridges
  d. Describe how geographic characteristics determine choices, such as climate guides decisions about food, clothing, and shelter
d. Describe how geographic characteristics of places and regions change over time and influence the way people live and work
      d. Identify geographic factors that have influenced international relations and economic development in world regions, such as trade, infrastructure, and health issues
 
C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas C. Movement of People, Goods and Ideas
1. Identify the role of transportation in the community
1. Describe how transportation and communication link people and places
1. Explain how transportation and communication link people and places by the movement of goods, messages, and people
1. Explain how transportation and communication link places by the movement of people, goods, and ideas
1. Describe how transportation and communication networks link places through the movement of people, goods, and ideas
1. Describe and analyze population growth, migration, and settlement patterns in Maryland and regions of the United States
1. Describe and analyze population growth, migration and settlement patterns in Colonial America
1. Describe and analyze population growth, migration and settlement patterns in early world history
1. Describe and analyze population growth, migration and settlement patterns in contemporary world regions
1. Analyze population growth, migration and settlement patterns in the United States prior to 1877
a. Recognize transportation as a means of traveling from place to place
a. Identify ways that people travel on land, water, and air
a. Identify how transportation links people and goods between places
a. Compare types of transportation used to move goods and people today and long ago
a. Explain how transportation and communication networks connect places, people, and ideas
a. Explain how geographic characteristics influenced settlement patterns in Maryland and the United States
a. Explain how geographic characteristics influenced settlement patterns in Colonial America
a. Identify reasons why people migrate, such as economic opportunity, climate, and political reasons
a. Identify reasons why people migrate, such as economic opportunity, climate, political reasons and government policies
a. Explain why Americans migrated west, such as fertile soil, minerals, and economic opportunity, and the impact on that region
b. Identify ways in which people travel to various places in the community, such as bus, car, and bicycle
b. Explain how transportation is used to move goods and people from place to place
b. Explain how communication links people and messages between places
b. Compare ways people communicate ideas today and long ago
b. Identify reasons for the movement of people from one community or region to another
b. Explain how changes in transportation and communication led to the growth and development of towns and cities in Maryland and United States
b. Analyze the consequences of migration between the colonies and immigration to the colonies, such as Europeans and Africans immigrating to the east coast of the United States
b. Explain how the development of transportation and communication networks influenced the movement of people, goods and ideas from place to place, such as trade routes in Africa, Asia and Europe, and the spread of Islam
b. Evaluate the consequences of migration and settlement in various regions of the world, such as employment, changes in population and cultural diversity/conflict
b. Describe the effects of the influx of immigrants on the United States
  c. Identify ways that people communicate messages
      d. Describe the transportation and communication networks for the movement of people, goods, and ideas to, from and within Maryland such as Bay Bridge, National Road, B & O Railroad, the Port of Baltimore, and C & O Canal
c. Explain the importance of shipping and trading to the economic development of the colonies, such as Triangular Trade
c. Describe how economic systems and cultural diffusion help to shape patterns of human settlement and interaction
c. Explain how regional population patterns, trends, and projections affect the environment and influence government policies
c. Explain how the regional demographic factors of constituents, such as race, ethnicity, education, occupation, and wealth affect public policy and voting issues
          e. Identify the reasons for the movement of peoples to, from, and within Maryland and the United States
       
D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment D. Modifying and Adapting to the Environment
1. Describe how people adapt to their immediate environment
1. Describe how people adapt to and modify their immediate environment
1. Explain how people modify, protect, and adapt to their environment
1. Explain how people modify, protect, and adapt to their environment
1. Explain how people modify, protect and adapt to their environment
1. Describe how people adapt to, modify and impact the natural environment
1. Explain why and how people adapt to and modify the natural environment and the impact of those modifications
1. Analyze why and how people modify their natural environment and the impact of those modifications
1. Analyze why and how people in contemporary world regions modify their natural environment and the impact of those modifications
1. Analyze why and how people in the United States modify their natural environment and the impact of those modifications
a. Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wearing clothing that is appropriate to the weather
a. Identify ways people adapt to the environment, such as wearing clothing that is appropriate to the weather
a. Describe how people in a community modify their environment to meet changing needs for shelter, such as clearing land for a housing community
a. Describe ways, such as clearing trees and farming land, that people modify their environment and the impact of those modifications
a. Describe how people in a community modify their environment to meet changing needs for transportation, shelter and making a living
a. Compare ways Native American societies in Maryland used the natural environment for food, clothing, and shelter
a. Compare ways Native American societies used the natural environment for food, clothing, and shelter
a. Describe ways people modified their environment to meet their needs, such as cultivating lands, building roads, dams, and aqueducts
a. Identify trade offs of using resources to pursue economic opportunities v. preserving the environment, such as water use, the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, and strip mining
a. Analyze the trade offs of using resources to pursue economic opportunities v. preserving the environment, such as westward movement
  b. Identify ways that people change their environment to meet their needs, such as planting crops or cutting forests
b. Describe why and how people protect the environment
b. Describe how and why people protect or fail to protect the environment
b. Describe why and how people make decisions about protecting the environment
b. Describe ways and reasons people in Maryland and the United States modify the natural environment and the consequences of modifications
b. Describe ways that colonists in the New England, Middle and Southern regions adapted to and modified the environment, such as the uses of the grist mill, water wheels and plantation farming
b. Analyze how people in early world history perceived and reacted to environmental concerns, such as flooding, drought, and depletion of natural resources and evaluate the consequences of those actions
b. Evaluate the consequences of modifying the natural environment, such as desertification, air pollution, and climate change
b. Explain the consequences of modifying the natural environment, such as soil erosion, loss of soil fertility and over-fishing
    c. Explain how people adapt to changes in the environment, such as using less water in the drought
c. Explain how people adapt to changes in the environment
c. Compare ways that people adapt to the environment for food, clothing, and shelter
c. Explain how the growth of communities and suburbs have had consequences on the environment, loss of farmland, and pollution
c. Explain how colonists adapted to and modified their environments and how these modifications sometimes created environmental problems
  c. Identify and explain land use issues that illustrate the conflict between economic growth, deforestation, mining, and burning fossil fuels
c. Identify and explain land use issues that illustrate the conflict between economic growth and using the environment
          d. Describe how land use and urban growth are influenced by governmental decisions
    d. Explain how land use and environmental issues such as burning the rain forest and environmental preservation are addressed by government policy
d. Analyze how land use was managed by the federal government such as the Land Ordinance of 1785 and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787
 

 

MSDE has developed a toolkit for these standards which can be found online at: http://mdk12.org/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/vsc_toolkit.html.

 

Date: 1/27/2015