School Improvement in Maryland

State Curriculum: Science Grade K

January 2008
PK–3 Acrobat 168k Ms Word 310k
3–8 Acrobat 206k Ms Word 445k
View Glossary - Highlighted Assessment Limits

Standard 1.0 Skills and Processes

Topic

A. Constructing Knowledge

Indicator

  • 1. Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of them by making careful observations and trying things out.

Objectives

  1. Describe what can be learned about things by just observing those things carefully and adding information by sometimes doing something to the things and noting what happens.
  1. Seek information through reading, observation, exploration, and investigations.
  1. Use tools such as thermometers, magnifiers, rulers, or balances to extend their senses and gather data.
  1. Explain that when a science investigation is done the way it was done before, we expect to get a very similar result.
  1. Participate in multiple experiences to verify that science investigations generally work the same way in different places.
  1. Suggest things that you could do to find answers to questions raised by observing objects and/or phenomena (events such as, water disappearing from the classroom aquarium or a pet's water bowl).
  1. Use whole numbers and simple, everyday fractions in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

Topic

B. Applying Evidence and Reasoning

Indicator

  • 1. People are more likely to believe your ideas if you can give good reasons for them.

Objectives

  1. Provide reasons for accepting or rejecting ideas examined.
  1. Develop reasonable explanations for observations made, investigations completed, and information gained by sharing ideas and listening to others' ideas.
  1. Explain why it is important to make some fresh observations when people give different descriptions of the same thing.

Topic

C. Communicating Scientific Information

Indicator

  • 1. Ask, "How do you know?" in appropriate situations and attempt reasonable answers when others ask them the same question.

Objectives

  1. Describe things as accurately as possible and compare observations with those of others.
  1. Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.
  1. Draw pictures that correctly portray at least some features of the thing being described and sequence events (seasons, seed growth).
  1. Have opportunities to work with a team, share findings with others, and recognize that all team members should reach their own conclusions about what the findings mean.
  1. Recognize that everybody can do science and invent things and ideas.

Topic

D. Technology

Indicator

  • 1. Design and make things with simple tools and a variety of materials.

Objectives

  1. Make something out of paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects that can actually be used to perform a task.
  1. Recognize that tools are used to do things better or more easily and to do some things that could not otherwise be done at all.
  1. Assemble, describe, take apart and reassemble constructions using interlocking blocks, erector sets and the like.
  1. Recognize that some kinds of materials are better than others for making any particular thing, for example, materials that are better in some ways (such as stronger and cheaper) may be worse in other ways (such as heavier and harder to cut).
  1. Explain that sometimes it is not possible to make or do everything that is designed.

Indicator

  • 2. Practice identifying the parts of things and how one part connects to and affects another.

Objectives

  1. Investigate a variety of objects to identify that most things are made of parts
  1. Explain that something may not work if some of its parts are missing.
  1. Explain that when parts are put together, they can do things that they couldn't do by themselves.

Indicator

  • 3. Examine a variety of physical models and describe what they teach about the real things they are meant to resemble.

Objectives

  1. Explain that a model of something is different from the real thing but can be used to learn something about the real thing.
  1. Realize that one way to describe something is to say how it is like something else.

Standard 2.0 Earth/Space Science

Topic

A. Materials and Processes That Shape A Planet

Indicator

  • 1. Investigate objects and materials in the environment.

Objectives

  1. Observe and describe a variety of natural and human-made objects found in familiar environments (school, neighborhood, etc.).
  1. Examine and describe Earth materials.
    • rocks
    • soil
    • water
  1. Using examples, describe that objects and materials, such as trees, rocks, and hills on Earth's surface can change.

Topic

D. Astronomy

Indicator

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the sun, moon and stars.
  1. Describe ways in which the daytime and nighttime skies are different.

Topic

E. Interactions of Hydrosphere and Atmosphere

Indicator

  • 2. Investigate and gather information about changes in weather.

Objectives

  1. Observe and describe different weather conditions using senses.
  1. Record observations using pictures, pictographs, or written/oral language.
  1. Describe qualitative changes in weather, such as temperatures, precipitation, wind, etc

Standard 3.0 Life Science

Topic

A. Diversity of Life

Indicator

  • 1. Observe a variety of familiar animals and plants (perhaps on the school grounds, in the neighborhood, and at home) to discover patterns of similarity and difference among them.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe features (observable parts) of animals and plants that make some of them alike in the way they look and the things they do.
  1. Compare descriptions of the features that make some animals and some plants very different from one another.
  1. Identify a feature that distinguishes animals that fly (as an example) from animals that cannot and examine a variety of animals that can fly to discover other similar features they might share.
  1. Compare ideas about how the features of animals and plants affect what these animals are able to do.

Indicator

  • 2. Gather information and direct evidence that humans have different external features, such as size, shape, etc., but that they are more like one another than like other animals.

Objectives

  1. Organize data collected and draw conclusions about similarities and differences among humans.
  1. Explain ways in which humans are more like one another than like other animals.
  1. Describe similarities in what both humans and other animals are able to do because they possess certain external features.

Topic

C. Genetics

Indicator

  • 1. Observe, describe and compare the life cycles of different kinds of animals and plants.

Objectives

  1. Identify and draw pictures that show what an animal (egg to frog) and a plant (seed to tree) looks like at each stage of its life cycle.
  1. Describe and compare the changes that occur in the life cycle of two different animals, such as a frog and a puppy and two different plants, such as a rosebush and a maple tree.
  1. Identify and describe the changes that occur in humans as they develop.
    • Size
    • Weight
    • Appearance of different parts

Topic

Indicator

  • 1. Recognize that living things are found almost everywhere in the world and that there are somewhat different kinds of living things in different places.

Objectives

  1. Observe, describe, and give examples and describe the many kinds of living things found in different places in Maryland.
  1. Using pictures, films and illustrated texts identify, describe and compare living things found in other states such as Texas and Alaska to those found in Maryland.
  1. Explain that the external features of plants and animals affect how well they thrive in different kinds of places.

Topic

E. Flow of Matter and Energy

Indicator

  • 1. Develop an awareness of the relationship of features of living things and their ability to satisfy basic needs that support their growth and survival.

Objectives

  1. Make observations of the features and behaviors of many different kinds of animals within an environment to identify and begin building a list of some of the basic needs these organisms share, such as water, air, etc.
  1. Describe ways that people and other animals manage to bring the things they need from their environment into their bodies.
  1. Make observations of the features of many different kinds of plants within an environment to identify and begin building a list of some of the basic needs these organisms share, such as water, light, etc.
  1. Describe the way that most plants manage to bring water from the environment into the plant.

Topic

F. Ecology

Indicator

  • 1. Investigate a variety of familiar places where plants and animals live to describe the place and the living things found there.

Objectives

  1. Describe observations using drawings, oral or written text of the place and some of the living things found there.
  1. Based on the observations collected at each place compare the plants and animals found there.
    • Location
    • Activity
    • Movement
    • Features
  1. Describe ways that animals and plants found in each place interact with each other and with their environment.

Standard 4.0 Chemistry

Topic

A. Structure of Matter

Indicator

  • 1. Compare the observable properties of a variety of objects and the materials they are made of using evidence from investigations.

Objectives

  1. Examine and describe various objects in terms of the materials, such as clay, cloth, paper, etc. from which they are made.
  1. Based on data, describe the observable properties, such as size, shape, color, and texture of a variety of objects.
  1. Identify and compare the properties of materials objects are made of and the properties of the objects.

Standard 5.0 Physics

Topic

A. Mechanics

Indicator

  • 1. Compare the different ways objects move.

Objectives

  1. Given many different objects, make them move and describe and compare how they move.
    • Straight
    • Round and round
    • Back and forth
    • Zig-Zag

Indicator

  • 2. Explain that there must be a cause for changes in the motion of an object

Objectives

  1. Observe and describe the ways in which a variety of objects' motion can be changed.
    • Sped up from a standstill
    • Slow down to a stop
    • Go faster
    • Go slower
    • No change
    • Change direction
  1. Based on observations, identify what caused the changes in an object's motion.
    • Push
    • Pull

Topic

B. Thermodynamics

Indicator

  • 1. Describe that sunlight warms the land, air, and water using observations and age appropriate tools.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and describe temperature changes of the land, air, and water before and after the sun warms them using senses and thermometers.

Topic

Indicator

  • 3. Observe and gather information from the explorations to describe how magnets affect some objects.

Objectives

  1. Observe and describe what happens when magnets are placed on or near objects made of different materials.
  1. Raise and seek answers to questions about what happened to the objects investigated and/or to the magnet.

Topic

D. Wave Interactions

Indicator

  • 2. Observe and describe that sound is produced by vibrating objects.

Objectives

  1. Observe and relate the vibrations of objects that make sounds (drums, guitar strings, and tuning forks) to the sounds felt and heard.
  1. Based on information from observations identify the source of vibrations in familiar objects that produce sounds.

Standard 6.0 Environmental Science

Topic

B. Environmental Issues

Indicator

  • 1. Identify aspects of the environment that are made by humans and those that are not made by humans.

Objectives

  1. Identify features of the natural environment, such as parks, zoos, buildings, etc. that are made by humans.
  1. Identify features of the natural environment that are not made by humans.

January 2008